Ayyam-i-Ha in Amman

Jordan is home to a small Baha’i community of approximately 1,000 people. After meeting a lovely Baha’i man in London at the House of Commons, I have learned a little more about the Baha’i and he and his friends have always been exceptionally kind, welcoming, and fascinating. It was he who introduced me to his niece here in Amman, a prominent member of the Baha’i community and wonderfully well-traveled woman.

On Saturday, she invited me to join her and her family and neighbours for the Festival of Ayyam-i-Ha.  Continue reading

Off the beaten track: Dead Sea

I love Jordan. Every day I have a moment where I feel this absolute peace and think “I am in the right place”. Every single day since I’ve moved here, 5 months ago.

That being said, one of the most frustrating things about Jordan is the fact that almost everything is privatized. You want to go to the Dead Sea for a day? The first thing people think of is “which hotel will I go to for day access?” Call me crazy, but I find paying a minimum of $50 for day access to a beach absurd. I also don’t want to spend a day floating in the Dead Sea and looking at a half dozen hotels and a lot of people. Continue reading

Snow in the Holy City

Now that I’ve been back in Jerusalem I have wanted to update my blog for a while… I never finished updating about my holidays because it began feeling a little like a chore. This blog is first and foremost for me, a log of things that I have done and enjoyed or not enjoyed, a record of things I have experienced and witnessed. It’s supposed to be exactly like traveling is – sporadic.

In any case, I left the wild winter in Montreal (though I am happy I stayed long enough to see the crazy, record-breaking snow storms in the Laurentians and in the city itself) and arrived in Tel Aviv shortly after midnight on January 1st. Nervous, but hiding it, I was surprised to have glided easily through immigration and I was out – back in Israel, back to somewhere I had been dreaming of for a long time. Continue reading

Breezing up north

The eighth of January was rainy and I spent much of it crying as the boyfriend and I parted ways. The gloomy weather seemed to complement and soothe my mood (I’m sure, however, that my parents disagree) and I cried with the skies as we drove from Isfiya to Akko, which I had been dying to visit for a long while. Unfortunately, due to time restrictions we only had time to pop into the Old City for an afternoon visit, much of which we spent exploring the excavations of medieval buildings that belonged to the Knights Templar. We enjoyed it thoroughly, and for me there was a certain satisfaction in being alone (I moved off from the parents for a bit and did my own exploration) or on the phone to my best friend who was doing his utmost to cheer me up.

Following that, we entered Old Akko proper and wandered through the market place looking for certain landmarks and historical sites and – to my mother’s great frustration – failing to find them. It was a grey and windy day, so we stepped beyond the walls and by the sea. The hard-hitting spray and strong wings resulted in us quickly stepping back to protect our cameras and find a place where I could grab a hummus sandwich before heading back to the car and driving up to Rosh Hanikra.  Continue reading

The Carmel Mountains

On Friday morning we woke up early and checked out of Chef Hostel, piling into the car to drive up to Haifa. The drive there was easy enough and quite pleasant, but once we were in Haifa and had to find the home of my mother’s friend we were completely lost. While we made the journey from Tel Aviv to Haifa in record time (about an hour and a half) we spent another 30 minutes driving oh so slowly up the Carmel mountain and driving in circles to find the little street that we had to get to.

We finally found my mother’s friend – a man who had been her leader in a Jewish youth group when she was 15 and who was responsible for my journey to Israel – and we got into his car and headed up to the Druze village of Isfiya, which I had visited once many months prior. My mother was elated, chattering away while my father and I enjoyed the beautiful views. Once there, we stopped off at a Druze restaurant and ate until we were stuffed. Honestly, we all ordered a main dish but we could have just as easily satiated ourselves on the many salads that our table creaked beneath.  Continue reading

Tel Aviv with the family

Early in January, my family and I headed to Tel Aviv for a brief visit. In case it hasn’t yet been clear, I’m not crazy about the city but everyone else wanted to see what it was like and my mother had a good friend from her kibbutz days there that she wanted to see.

We arrived just before 3pm and checked into a hostel (prices are absurd in Tel Aviv) right in the city center before hopping into a cab, at my insistence, and heading to Abu Hassan in Jaffa for hummus and masabacha. The food, as always, was divine and I stumbled through my orders in elementary Arabic. My mother wasn’t crazy about the masabacha because for some reason she didn’t like the taste of too much tahini in humus. Continue reading

Welcoming in 2012 in Israel and Palestine

After our devastatingly exciting New Year’s Eve (note the sarcasm) we woke up very early on New Year’s Day to start 2012 with a refreshing dip in the Dead Sea. Even though I have been living in Israel, only two hours from the Dead Sea, for 7 months, I hadn’t yet visited so my first dip into the salty water was as exciting as it was for my brother and father.

It was wonderful. I didn’t want to leave and only got out of the water when my parents insisted we do so. My brother and I spent the entire time giggling and trying different ways to turn in the water, executing complicated yoga poses and trying to swim despite the current. I was so tempted to go out a long way. However, it seems the water can be quite lethal and no one wanted to accompany me, so I did not. Continue reading